Milforum

Globalt toppbanner

Collapse

Kunngjøring

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Soldat i sivil drept av religiøse terrorister i England ?

Collapse

Annonse før emne

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Tid
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • AGR416
    replied
    http://www.aftenposten.no/nyheter/ur...l#.UbPDtTk4VD8


    Derfor er de «ensomme ulvene» farlige

    Hjemmesnekret terror krever ikke treningen og finansieringen som terroristgrupper pleide å sørge for. Og det er veldig vanskelig å avsløre dem før de slår til.

    Leave a comment:


  • AGR416
    replied
    Tony Blair skrev nylig en artikkel om dette i The Daily Mail:

    There is only one view of the murder of Lee Rigby: horrific. But there are two views of its significance.

    One is that it is the act of crazy people, motivated in this case by a perverted idea about Islam, but of no broader significance.

    Crazy people do crazy things. So don’t overreact.

    The other view is that this act was indeed horrible; and that the ideology which inspired it is profound and dangerous.

    I am of this latter view.

    So of course we shouldn’t overreact. We didn’t after July 7, 2005. But we did act. And we were right to. The actions by our security services will undoubtedly have prevented other serious attacks.

    The ‘Prevent’ programme in local communities was sensible. The new measures of the Government seem reasonable and proportionate.

    However, we are deluding ourselves if we believe that we can protect this country simply by what we do here. The ideology is out there. It isn’t diminishing.

    Consider the Middle East. As of now, Syria is in a state of accelerating disintegration. President Assad is brutally pulverising communities hostile to his regime. At least 80,000 have died. The refugees now total more than one million. The internally displaced are more than four million.

    Many in the region believe that the Assad intention is to ethnically cleanse the Sunni from the areas dominated by his regime and then form a separate state around Lebanon. There would then be a de facto Sunni state in the rest of Syria, cut off from the wealth of the country or the sea.

    The Syrian opposition is made up of many groups. The fighters are increasingly the Al Qaeda- affiliated group Jabhat al-Nusra. They are winning support, and arms and money from outside the country.

    Assad is using chemical weapons on a limited but deadly scale. Some of the stockpiles are in fiercely contested areas.

    The overwhelming desire of the West is to stay out of it. This is completely understandable. But we must also understand: we are at the beginning of this tragedy. Its capacity to destabilise the region is clear.

    Jordan is behaving with exemplary courage, but there is a limit to the refugees it can reasonably be expected to absorb. Lebanon is now fragile as Iran pushes Hezbollah into the battle. Al Qaeda is back trying to cause carnage in Iraq and Iran continues its gruesome meddling there.

    To the South in Egypt and across North Africa, Muslim Brotherhood parties are in power, but the contradiction between their ideology and their ability to run modern economies means that they face growing instability and pressure from more extreme groups.

    Then there is the Iranian regime, still intent on getting a nuclear weapon, still exporting terror and instability to the West and the east of it. In sub-Saharan Africa, Nigeria is facing awful terror attacks. In Mali, France has been fighting a pretty tough battle.

    And we haven’t mentioned Pakistan or Yemen. Go to the Far East and look at the western border between Burma and Bangladesh. Look at recent events in Bangladesh itself, or the Mindanao dispute in the Muslim region of the Philippines.

    In many of the most severely affected areas, one other thing is apparent: a rapidly growing population. The median age in the Middle East is in the mid-20s. In Nigeria it’s 19. In Gaza, where Hamas hold power, a quarter of the population is under five.

    When I return to Jerusalem soon, it will be my 100th visit to the Middle East since leaving office, working to build a Palestinian state. I see first-hand in this region what is happening.

    So I understand the desire to look at this world and explain it by reference to local grievances, economic alienation and of course ‘crazy people’. But are we really going to examine it and find no common thread, nothing that joins these dots, no sense of an ideology driving or at least exacerbating it all?

    There is not a problem with Islam. For those of us who have studied it, there is no doubt about its true and peaceful nature. There is not a problem with Muslims in general. Most in Britain will be horrified at Lee Rigby’s murder.

    But there is a problem within Islam – from the adherents of an ideology that is a strain within Islam. And we have to put it on the table and be honest about it.

    Of course there are Christian extremists and Jewish, Buddhist and Hindu ones. But I am afraid this strain is not the province of a few extremists. It has at its heart a view about religion and about the interaction between religion and politics that is not compatible with pluralistic, liberal, open-minded societies.

    At the extreme end of the spectrum are terrorists, but the world view goes deeper and wider than it is comfortable for us to admit. So by and large we don’t admit it. This has two effects. First, those with that view think we are weak and that gives them strength.

    Second, those within Islam – and the good news is there are
    many – who actually know this problem exists and want to do something about it, lose heart. All over the Middle East and beyond there is a struggle being played out.

    On the one side, there are Islamists who have this exclusivist and reactionary world view. They are a significant minority, loud and well organised. On the other are the modern-minded, those who hated the old oppression by corrupt dictators and who hate the new oppression by religious fanatics. They are potentially the majority, but unfortunately they are badly organised.

    The seeds of future fanaticism and terror, possibly even major conflict, are being sown. We have to help sow seeds of reconciliation and peace. But clearing the ground for peace is not always peaceful.

    The long and hard conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq have made us wary of any interventions abroad. But we should never forget why they were long and hard. We allowed failed states to come into being.

    Saddam was responsible for two major wars, in which hundreds of thousands died, many by chemical weapons. He killed similar numbers of his own people.

    The Taliban grew out of the Russian occupation of Afghanistan and made the country into a training ground for terror. Once these regimes were removed, both countries have struggled against the same forces promoting violence and terror in the name of religion everywhere.

    Not every engagement need be military; or where military, involve troops. But disengaging from this struggle won’t bring us peace.

    Neither will security alone. We resisted revolutionary communism by being resolute on security; but we defeated it by a better idea: Freedom. We can do the same with this.

    The better idea is a modern view of religion and its place in society and politics. There has to be respect and equality between people of different faiths. Religion must have a voice in the political system but not govern it.

    We have to start with how to educate children about faith, here and abroad. That is why I started a foundation whose specific purpose is to educate children of different faiths across the world to learn about each other and live with each other.

    We are now in 20 countries and the programmes work. But it is a drop in the ocean compared with the flood of intolerance taught to so many. Now, more than ever, we have to be strong and we have to be strategic.
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/ar...ch-attack.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Bving1981
    replied
    Hvis man skulle ende opp der at man skal være redd for å gå i uniform i Norge så er det på tide å stramme opp litt på hva vi tolererer av atferd fra enkelte elementer.
    Bruke litt sterkere virkemidler enn sinte brev og pekefinger.

    Leave a comment:


  • Takkatt
    replied
    Jørgen Lohne med interessant intervju av Omar Bakri, muslimsk predikant med tidligere adresse London, nå bosatt i Tripoli, Libanon.

    http://www.aftenposten.no/nyheter/ur...l#.Ua2UopvJrPU

    Leave a comment:


  • yamaha
    replied
    BBC har, som vanlig, en mer utfyllende artikkel om saken:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-22634468

    Sources said reports the men had featured in "several investigations" in recent years - but were not deemed to be planning an attack - "were not inaccurate".

    They confirmed one of the suspects was intercepted by police last year while leaving the country.
    Legger også merke til følgende:

    Meanwhile, armed forces personnel based in London and elsewhere have been told to be more vigilant.

    That is on top of the extra precautions now being taken at London's 10 or so main barracks.

    Chief of Defence Staff General Sir David Richards: "This was outside the base and I am confident that security is as tight as it has ever been. It is a very difficult balancing act. We are very proud of the uniform we wear. We have huge support around the country. I think this is a completely isolated incident - we will wait for confirmation - but that is my view."

    He said there was "no reason we should not wear our uniforms with pride but on a common-sense basis".

    BBC defence correspondent Caroline Wyatt said that, since British forces intervened in Iraq and Afghanistan, they and their families have been well aware they might be targets at home.

    At least two plots by Islamist extremists to kill soldiers in the UK have been foiled in recent years.

    Leave a comment:


  • Safariland
    replied
    Når dumme ting skjer skjønner ikke folk hvorfor E-tjenesten ikke sniker seg til ting de egentlig ikke har lov til. Men om E-tjenesten sniker seg til ting de egentlig ikke har lov til får de på pukkelen så det holder..

    Leave a comment:


  • isak
    replied
    Hvordan skulle de klart det? Da må vel lovverket endres?

    Leave a comment:


  • yamaha
    replied
    Med forbehold om at opplysningene som kommer frem her, så kan det bli en stygg affære for britisk e-tjeneste.
    http://www.aftenposten.no/nyheter/ur...l#.UaJvZPBiy5k

    Kritiserer etterretningstjenesten etter soldatdrap i England

    Han har vært arrestert i Kenya, deltok på flere demonstrasjoner sammen med andre radikale islamister og skal ha blitt forsøkt rekruttert av etterretningstjenesten. Burde den mistenkte bak soldatdrapet i England ha vært stoppet før?

    Leave a comment:


  • Navytimes
    replied
    Re: Soldat i sivil drept av religiøse terrorister i England ?

    Organisert oppvigling til raseopptøyer kunne muligens falle inn under definisjonen terrorisme i mitt hode.

    Tenk fundamentalistiske prester, tenk kassettene med oppfordring til folkemord som ble distribuert i Rwanda.

    Skrevet etter beste evne på Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:


  • M72
    replied
    Opprinnelig skrevet av AGR416 Vis post
    Hvorfor mener du at opptøyene i Stockholm kan anses som terrorisme?.
    Det mener jeg ikke. Og det var heller ikke det jeg skrev.

    Jeg forsøkte å illustrere at en for vid definisjon av terrorisme er meningsløs.

    Opprinnelig skrevet av AGR416 Vis post
    I mitt hode er disse to situasjonene helt forskjellige, og det som skjer i Stockholm faller ikke innenfor de motivasjonene jeg oppga over. Her er det snakk om innvandrere som er sinna fordi politiet skjøt en eldre mann (som truet folk med machete). Det er ikke gjort kun i den hensikt å skape frykt og terror, noe en offentlig henrettelse av en britisk soldat ganske så klart er..
    Det at politiet skjøt mannen er nok den utløsende faktoren, men motivasjonen til uroen er bl.a. at enkelte mener seg forskjellsbehandlet (utdanningsnivå, sysselsetting, sosiale faktorer etc). De viser at de er villige til å bruke vold for å endre samfunnet. Som Reinfeldt har sagt: "Det handlar om en grupp arga män som tror att man med våld kan förändra samhället." Og det passer godt med det som du oppga over, som var: "Det man trenger er en ideologi/et tankesett/en sak man er villig til å å bruke vold for å påvirke/fremme."

    Når det gjelder drapet i London har det bl.a. kommet frem at minst en av gjerningsmennene var kjent fra før, dvs. det er mulig de umiddelbart hadde nok informasjon til å kunne konkludere tidlig.

    Leave a comment:


  • AGR416
    replied
    Opprinnelig skrevet av M72 Vis post
    Det jeg reagerte på var hvor fort de konkluderte med at det var terrorisme, ikke nødvendigvis konklusjonen.

    Med definisjonen av terrorisme som du bruker her (som minner om definisjonen i Sikkerhetsloven) kan også f.eks. uroen i Stockholm kalles terrorisme. Jeg synes det skal mer til enn ett drap (selv om det er politisk motivert) for å kunne kalle en kriminell handling for terrorisme. F.eks. at det er ledd i en sekvens. Grunnen er at jeg mener begrepet "terrorisme" blir utvannet av det.
    Hvorfor mener du at opptøyene i Stockholm kan anses som terrorisme? I mitt hode er disse to situasjonene helt forskjellige, og det som skjer i Stockholm faller ikke innenfor de motivasjonene jeg oppga over. Her er det snakk om innvandrere som er sinna fordi politiet skjøt en eldre mann (som truet folk med machete). Det er ikke gjort kun i den hensikt å skape frykt og terror, noe en offentlig henrettelse av en britisk soldat ganske så klart er.

    At det finnes personer som deltar i opptøyene som har slike ekstremistiske tanker, og benytter muligheten til å lage litt faenskap skal man ikke se bort i fra.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gehenna
    replied
    Jeg forsøkte ordlegge meg dit at de ikke behøvde konkludere med det i tidlige stadium, de brukte terminologien for terrorisme for å kunne bruke spekteret de behøvde for å bl.a kunne konkludere med terrorisme (senere). Blir det lesbart ?

    Leave a comment:


  • AGR416
    replied
    @Gehenna:

    Hvor tar du det fra at de ikke konkluderte med terror innledningsvis? For meg fremstår det som at de, med rette, anså dette som terror.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gehenna
    replied
    Er ikke så sikker på at de "konkluderte" med terrorisme i de tidlige faser :

    -de har av årsakene fra 60/70/80-tallet av hatt en terrorlovgivning som gir dem visse andre muligheter enn om detta skulle vært guttungen i naboskjulet som tøyset med en tilfeldig soldat.

    Men at de i ettertid ikke har nedjustert beskrivelsen av handlingen, er vel mer å anse som en konklusjon.

    Leave a comment:


  • M72
    replied
    Ganske bra kommentar fra Roger Griffin: En «ren» terrorhandling.

    Leave a comment:


  • AGR416
    replied
    Her får gutta kjenne på konsekvensene:

    http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news...-video-1907772

    Tydelig at de var ute etter å bli martyrer.

    Leave a comment:


  • AGR416
    replied
    En litt lengre video, hvor mer av "talen" til gjerningsmannen er med:

    http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=16d_1369355226

    Leave a comment:


  • Safariland
    replied
    http://www.aftenposten.no/nyheter/ur...l#.UZ5nUIdM-iA

    Pågripelser i saken.

    Leave a comment:


  • M72
    replied
    Det jeg reagerte på var hvor fort de konkluderte med at det var terrorisme, ikke nødvendigvis konklusjonen.

    Med definisjonen av terrorisme som du bruker her (som minner om definisjonen i Sikkerhetsloven) kan også f.eks. uroen i Stockholm kalles terrorisme. Jeg synes det skal mer til enn ett drap (selv om det er politisk motivert) for å kunne kalle en kriminell handling for terrorisme. F.eks. at det er ledd i en sekvens. Grunnen er at jeg mener begrepet "terrorisme" blir utvannet av det.

    Leave a comment:


  • AGR416
    replied
    Var ABB del av et nettverk? Ikke påviselig. Var hans handlinger terrorisme? Ja.

    Man trenger ikke å tilhøre et større nettverk for at man skal karakterisere noe som terrorisme. Terrorisme kommer i mange former, både soloterrorister, grupperinger etc.

    Det man trenger er en ideologi/et tankesett/en sak man er villig til å å bruke vold for å påvirke/fremme. Nå har jeg lest at en av de som ble pågrepet i går har tidligere vært arrestert fordi han var på vei til Somalia for å bli med i Al-Shabab, og det er nå sterke bevis for at de faktisk tilhører et terrornettverk.

    For ekstrem islamisme sin del, så handler mye om at vesten er en stor trussel mot islam og at man har plikt til å drepe vantro. Trenger ikke være mer komplisert enn det.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lille Arne
    replied
    Absolutt ikke første gang terrorister har gått etter individuelle soldater i UK:http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...-like-pig.htmlDe var også plaget med det på 70-80-90-tallet. Da hadde terroristene en annen religiøs tilhørighet.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rittmester
    replied
    Enig med M-72. Det kan jo tenkes at britiske myndigheter hadde bakgrunnsinformasjon, siden de var så raskt ut med å kalle inn Cobra. På meg virket det ikke så voldsomt planmessig, der de virret rundt etter drapet, og satset på tilfeldige forbipasserende med mobilkamera for å få spredt budskapet sitt.

    Leave a comment:


  • M72
    replied
    Ja, klart. Men et angrep på en soldat i fritida trenger ikke være terrorisme. Man bør fastslå at soldaten ble angrepet fordi han var soldat, og at gjerningsperson(ene) er tilknyttet et nettverk/organisasjon (og f.eks. ikke bare var ruspåvirket med en fiks idé). Og det synes jeg det er litt pussig at de umiddelbart kunne konkludere med (dersom det da ikke forelå konkret informasjon om noe slikt på forhånd).

    Leave a comment:


  • Sofakriger
    replied
    Angrep på soldater på fritid/etter tjeneste i hjemlandet har vært på trusselkartet i mange år. Om det har vært realistisk er et annet spørsmål.

    Leave a comment:


  • M72
    replied
    Hvor organisert og gjennomtenkt dette var er det ikke sikkert man umiddelbart hadde oversikt over, med mindre man hadde informasjon som gjorde at man forventet noe slikt. Og at en mann blir drept med kjøttøks skaper ikke noe særlig frykt før man omtaler det som "terror".

    Leave a comment:


  • Safariland
    replied
    Det har vel som med måten det ble gjennomført på, og muligens også at de hadde noen følere på at noe slikt kunne skje? Så kan man sikkert legge til at de ikke ville se ut som famlende etterpå dersom det viste seg at det var terror når de ikke hadde brydd seg.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sofakriger
    replied
    Tja, det er jo dette om terror forutsetter en organisasjon bak og gjennomtenkte handlinger, eller om gærninger med argumentasjon inspirert av noen makrokonflikter som lykkes med å angripe symboler og spre frykt produserer terror. Vi vet jo ikke nøyaktig hva dette er, men for briter flest tror jeg nok dette oppfattes som terror.

    Leave a comment:


  • M72
    replied
    Denne saken gir litt assosiasjoner til seriedrapene i Toulouse ifjor, der flere soldater ble drept.

    Jeg synes det er litt pussig at britiske myndigheter var så kjappe med å omtale hendelsen som en "terroraksjon".

    Leave a comment:


  • AGR416
    replied
    Islamsk fundamentalisme må selvfølgelig adresseres, men ikke nødvendigvis i denne tråden.
    Hvorfor ikke? Det er jo det tråden/hendelsen i bunn og grunn handler om. Hadde det vært et tilfeldig drap på en sivil, hadde dette vel ikke blitt linket til....?

    Årsaken til at dette ble gjort er kombinasjonen av at de det gjelder er gale og at de har blitt fristet av islamsk fundamentalisme.
    Hvordan vet du at det er kombinasjonen av faktorer som ligger bak? Må man være gal for å være fundamentalist? Mener du gal i folkelig sammenheng, eller psykiatrisk sammenheng? Å tilskrive alt dette som handlinger utført av "gærninger" er også å unngå problematikken. Akkurat som med ABB.

    Men det er ikke Islam som har gjort dette, og du kan ikke stille alle muslimer til veggs for det.
    Og igjen, hvem har påstått eller sagt at dette er alle muslimers ansvar? Det er ærlig talt skremmende at debatten blir vridd slik.

    Muslimer flest ser på islamske fundamentalister slik som kristne ser på Westboro Baptist Church. Førstnevnte er en større og viktigere gruppe enn sistnevnte, og begge grupper er problematiske, men det er av temmelig begrenset nytteverdi å ta generalisere fra de mest ekstreme til hovedgruppen, og så bruke det mot andre religiøse enkeltpersoner.
    Sorry mac, men å sammenligne muslimske fundamentalister med WBC blir skivebom. WBC består av ca 40 personer. Og som det har vært påpekt tidligere, de moderate muslimene burde bli flinkere til å ta avstand fra ekstreme handlinger i det offentlige rom. Noen gjør det jo, og jeg er sikker på at de faktisk tar avstand, men flere burde vise det.

    Leave a comment:


  • Herr Brun
    replied
    Soldat i sivil drept av religiøse terrorister i England ?

    Opprinnelig skrevet av AGR416 Vis post
    Igjen, mener du at vi ikke skal ta debatten? Bare vende det andre kinnet til og tie det ihjel?
    Nei. Men å reagere på at Ubaydullah Hussain skriver noe på facebook er ikke å "ta debatten". Og om du er lei mediekåtheten hans, så har det lite for seg å spre "nyheter" om ham.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X